5th GSL Summit – April 15-17, 2018

GSL 5: Dignity and Justice in Global Service-Learning

Summit Dates:  Sunday, April 15 – Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Pre-Session Global Service-Learning 101:  Saturday, April 14 – Sunday, April 15

Notre Dame Conference Center

University of Notre Dame

South Bend, IN 46556 

Summit Overview:

Global service-learning (GSL) is co-created by communities, organizations and institutions of higher education that together seek to advance the common good by addressing pressing issues facing local communities, nations and our world. GSL takes many forms and is found across the wide range of institutions that make up the diverse landscape of higher education and community development organizations.

The 5th Global Service-Learning Summit, to be held at the University of Notre Dame, seeks to create a space for active listening and critical dialogue between secular and faith-based organizations that are committed to co-educating and collaborating for social change and that wish to recover and re-examine the values which underlie the work.

The Summit’s theme, Dignity and Justice in Global Service-Learning, aims to bring visibility and awareness to the history, richness of values and moral dimensions in higher education, including the role of faith-based and secular institutions in supporting community and international development, civic and political engagement, democracy and human rights, while also educating students as faith-filled people and/or socially responsible global citizens.

Furthermore, the Summit will serve to address lacunae in the fields of civic and global education, global service-learning, community and international development and their intersections. It will call for further dialogue, research, and developing a more nuanced understanding of the role of values in global service-learning, and attention to the role of faith-based organizations in social and economic development, a topic that has only recently started to attract academic interest.

Faith-based nonprofit organizations constitute almost 60 percent of U.S.-based international development organizations, and their contribution to international social development is considerable. In April 2015, global religious and faith-based organization leaders issued a call and commitment entitled “Ending Extreme Poverty: A Moral and Spiritual Imperative” to end extreme poverty by 2030, a goal shared by the World Bank Group and in concerted support for the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals. World Bank President Jim Yong Kim spoke at the conference of religious leaders that developed the statement, making this claim: “I believe that some of the most important leaders in the movement to end extreme poverty will be people of faith, people who are motivated fundamentally to help the most vulnerable among us.”

Primary audiences for this 5th Global Service-Learning Summit will include faculty, researchers, practitioners and students in the fields of community and international development, social and economic development policy, civic and political engagement, global education and global service-learning.

Dignity and Justice in Global Service-Learning hopes to convene people from across all faith traditions and those who adhere to none, who represent perspectives from secular, land-grant, private, non-governmental, community-based, religious and faith-based institutions and organizations. All are most welcome.

Please join us April 15-17, 2018 at the University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN for GSL 5: Dignity and Justice in Global Service-Learning!

 

If your institution is interested in co-sponsoring GSL 5 and would like for more information, contact:

Nora Pillard Reynolds npreynolds@haverford.edu (globalsl.org & Haverford College),

Eric Hartman ehartman1@haverford.edu (Haverford College), or

Rachel Tomas Morgan rtomasmo@nd.edu (University of Notre Dame)

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Call for Proposals to Open Soon

Check back at for updated information

We seek theory, research, evaluation and assessment that advances quality in partnerships, practice, programming and pedagogy. Proposals may include theoretically and empirically grounded critique, theoretically robust models, and/or qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods inquiry with respect to the categories below. GSL 5: Dignity and Justice in Global Service-Learning seeks proposals that address the following:

Theme 1:  Dignity and Justice in Global Service-Learning

  • Community-campus partnerships that support the integral human development of the person
  • Community-campus partnerships that enact activism and organizing for dignity and justice
  • Intellectual, theoretical and real-world understandings of dignity and justice available to shape our work
  • Resources available from religious and faith-based traditions informing understandings of dignity and justice
  • Models of campus-community response to global and local challenges to dignity and justice
  • Lessons from community organizations in enacting principles and values embodying culturally contextualized understandings of dignity and justice
  • Supporting meaningful reflection, dialogue and learning on dignity and justice
  • Courses, curricula, programs, and community development projects reflecting dignity and justice
  • Dignity and justice and its relation to civic and political engagement, global service-learning and community development

Theme 2:  The Role of Values

  • The values and motivations that underlie this work and their relevance
  • Giving visibility and awareness to the history, richness of values and moral dimensions in higher education, including the role of faith-based and secular institutions in supporting community and international development, civic and political engagement, democracy and human rights, while also educating students as faith-filled people and/or socially responsible global citizens
  • Research and assessment on areas of values, faith, justice, social responsibility, civic and political engagement, global service-learning and any intersections
  • Embracing values and the role of advocacy or activist organizing within community-campus partnerships
  • The practice of global service-learning and its impact on student development, values education, faith formation, and vocation at both secular and faith-based education institutions
  • The role of reflection in connecting faith, civic and political engagement, service and learning
  • Shaping the moral imagination and imaging a better world

Theme 3:  Role of Faith-Based Initiatives, Institutions and Organizations  

  • Research and assessment on areas of values, faith, justice, social responsibility, global service-learning
  • Faith-based perspectives and practices of justice and social and civic responsibility
  • Dignity and justice and its relation to civic and global service-learning, and/or a faith perspective
  • The role of reflection in connecting faith, civic and political engagement, service and learning
  • Research and practice of interfaith dialogue, community development and global service-learning
  • The contributions of faith-based organizations in economic and social, community and international development
  • When faiths come together towards a common goal and purpose
  • The role of religion and faith motivating students for global service-learning, political engagement and work for justice
  • Preparing students to engage ethically with diverse communities, including diverse faiths and religions, both on and off campus
  • Relationship between fostering faith-filled students and global citizens

Theme 4:  Nurturing a Community of Practice

  • What secular and faith-based institutions, public, private and community colleges can learn from one another in our approaches to designing global service-learning opportunities
  • What diverse institutions can learn from one another with respect to how we think about student development goals, collaboration with communities and the commitments central to both
  • What we share in common and using our differences to strengthen and deepen our individual and collective work
  • Remembering and recalling why we do this work, the values which underlie the work that called us to it in the first place

Session Formats

Workshops

Workshops are designed to go in depth on a focused topic and bridge theory with practice. They should engage participants actively and articulate key learning goals and take-aways.

Facilitated Roundtable Discussions

Facilitated roundtable discussions should provide time for colleagues to examine topics through iterative sharing of expertise and experiences.

Panels

Panels can be pre-organized or individual session proposals can be organized as a panel. Panels in general are organized around research topics, themes, sharing of papers, practice, theory, etc.

Case Studies

Case study sessions should provide an applied setting for attendees to share knowledge, experience and perspective as they engage in critical conversations about effective community partnerships and community impacts through global service-learning (GSL). These case study sessions will have a dual purpose (1) to help build a community of practice among Summit participants and (2) to introduce participants to practical examples of effective practice in reciprocal engagement/community partnerships in GSL. Case studies should address outcomes related to community impact as outlined by community partners. Preference will be given to cases primarily or jointly authored by community organizations/community partners. Case studies should: 1) describe action and efforts across various stakeholders; 2) outline effective practice along with ongoing dilemmas, issues and struggles; 3) include 3-4 open-ended questions facing the future of the partnership; (4) include a strategy for facilitating a session that is engaged and participatory for all attendees; and (5) be fewer than 6 pages.